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Sprinkles from the Left

⏰🚀 Ready, Set, Go: These opinions take 1.72 minutes to read.

“Did Saudi Arabian government officials, operating secretly inside America, provide money and other assistance in the terrorist plot that killed nearly 3,000 people on Sept. 11, 2001?

As America approaches the 20th anniversary of that bloody day, it still has no conclusive answers over what has come to be known as the “Saudi Connection.”

Nor does America know why U.S. intelligence agencies — with the support of every president since George W. Bush — continue to turn a deaf ear to requests from Congress and relatives of 9/11 victims for information on Saudi Arabia’s links to the deadliest terrorist attack in American history…

After the attacks, U.S. investigators quickly focused attention on bin Laden’s terrorist al-Qaeda network, based in Afghanistan. Within months, however, the CIA also admitted that it had known that two of the eventual hijackers had been on the loose inside the U.S. since early 2000…

The CIA never told the FBI until only weeks before the 9/11 attacks that a pair of well-known al-Qaeda terrorists had been roaming across America… But the CIA’s revelation came too late for the FBI to step in and possibly break up the plot.

The disclosure that the CIA held back secrets from the FBI sparked an outcry from relatives of 9/11 victims. It eventually led to the series of revelations… that Saudi officials in California had assisted the two al-Qaeda operatives, Khalid al-Mihdhar and Nawaf al-Hazmi, in getting settled after they arrived in California in early 2000.

Al-Mihdhar and al-Hazmi eventually made their way across America to New Jersey. But how they made that trip – and who financed it – is still a mystery.”

Mike Kelly, NorthJersey.com

“A basic precept of international law is that sovereign nations, or their government officials, should not be liable for official actions in the civil courts of other sovereign nations. Sovereign immunity has stood the test of time because it makes practical sense. And it makes practical sense because the international deeds and misdeeds of governments are more equitably dealt with through state-to-state negotiations than by hauling one country’s officials in front of the judges and juries of another.

Alas, the Senate and the House have unanimously voted to weaken this principle in the noble-sounding cause of justice for American victims of alleged state-sponsored acts of terrorism. The legislation, sparked by much-ballyhooed but so-far-unsubstantiated claims of official Saudi collusion in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, would permit victims of acts of terrorism in the United States to sue alleged state sponsors for monetary damages in federal court…

Mr. Obama has repeatedly called it a precedent other countries could easily turn against the United States. It is not a far-fetched concern, given this country’s global use of intelligence agents, Special Operations forces and drones, all of which could be construed as state-sponsored “terrorism” when convenient.”

Editorial Board, Washington Post

Sprinkles from the Right

⏰🚀 Ready, Set, Go: These opinions take 1.62 minutes to read.

“The intricacies surrounding the kidnapping, torture and murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the Saudi consulate in Turkey this month remain enshrouded in a web of intrigue, but the manner with which it was carried out bears a striking resemblance to the 9/11 terrorist attacks that killed over 3,000 Americans…

To many investigators, it appears that the 9/11 attackers were either extremely lucky or had a lot of help, or both… The peculiar way in which the 9/11 attacks and the assassination of Jamal Khashoggi were orchestrated — using military personnel in civilian clothing, arriving in teams, and the apparent relationships of the attackers with the Saudi ruling elite — all point to a common progenitor. The styles rhyme, even if the targets differ…

[The] administration should not make the mistake that previous administrations made in assuming that mutually beneficial economic and geopolitical relationships between the United States and Saudi Arabia are free from serious risks. A marriage of convenience it may be, but made in heaven it is not.”

Armstrong Williams (@ARightSide) is author of the book “Reawakening Virtues” and served as an adviser and spokesman for Dr. Ben Carson’s 2016 presidential campaign. (Published in The Hill)

“Families of Sept. 11 victims have been on a 17-year-long quest to seek financial retribution from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, which they claim funded the terrorist attack that took the lives of their loved ones. Throughout the process, their attempts at uncovering the truth about Saudi Arabia’s role in the deadliest terrorist attack in American history have been impeded by the FBI and its former director, Robert Mueller…

New York-based lawyer Jim Kreindler, representing the families of the Sept. 11 victims, said in an interview with me that Mueller and his successor, James Comey, engaged in a systematic cover-up of evidence that the Saudi government aided the terrorists who committed the Sept. 11 attacks…

Several people formerly associated with the investigation stated that Saudi Arabia was financially involved with the Sept. 11 attacks, including John Lehman, a Republican member of the 9/11 Commission, and former Sen. Bob Graham, D-Fla., who chaired the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence at the time…

Despite mounting evidence and testimony from key players in the investigation as well as former politicians, Kreindler told me that he ran into significant roadblocks from the FBI and former directors Mueller and Comey…

It’s not just Kreindler pointing the finger at Mueller; Graham stated that Mueller personally intervened to cut off further inquiry regarding Saudi assistance to the hijackers in California…

The FBI didn’t become easier to work with once Comey took over… Kreindler believes the only way victims’ families will ever learn the whole truth is if [the] president… declassifies the investigation into Saudi ties with the Sept. 11 attacks.”

Ryan Girdusky, Washington Examiner